21.4" Triceratops Mandible (Lower Jaw) on Stand - North Dakota

 
 
 
 
This is an impressive, 21.4" long mandible of a Triceratops horridus. It was collected from our partners' lease in the Hell Creek Formation near Bowman, North Dakota this past summer. This incredible specimen is the left mandible that extends from the ramus (lower/upper jaw joint) to just before the beak. It shows a number of anatomical features including fossa and the lingual attachment. There are no teeth in this specimen but portions of the sockets are present and visible. It comes with the pictured custom metal display stand.

This jaw section preserved beautifully, requiring relatively little restoration and few repaired cracks. The restoration is in the form of gap fill in repaired cracks and in some spots where the bone wasn't recoverable. The most notable repaired crack is about 9.5" from the distal end of the mandible, requiring both crack repair and some gap fill restoration.

Triceratops
Triceratops skeleton Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. Photo: Allie Caulfield
Triceratops skeleton Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. Photo: Allie Caulfield
is one of the most recognized and intriguing of the North American ceratopsid dinosaurs. They stomped around the Late Cretaceous (around 68-66 mya), brandishing their three pronged and bony frilled skull, chewing on fibrous plants. They struggled against large predators, stood their ground, and tried not to be devoured by the ferocious Tyrannosaurus rex.

The head on a Triceratops may have been an intimidating show rather than a stabbing, defensive trident and imposing shield for inter-species jousting. Researchers have given close scrutiny to the holes, or fenestrae, of other ceratopsid crests. In the past, the holes within the shield were used to confirm separate species.

Individual Triceratops are estimated to have reached up to 9 meters (29.5 ft) in length, 3 meters (9.8 ft) in height, and weighed up to 26,000 lbs. The largest known skull is estimated to have been 2.5 m (8.2 ft) in length and would have extended almost a third of the length of the mature individual. The pointed horns were approximately 1 meter (3ft) long. With its sturdy build and powerful legs, Triceratops could have ripped open the predator that wanted this herbivore for dinner.

One
Closup of jaws and teeth. Photo: Bradypus
Closup of jaws and teeth. Photo: Bradypus
of the most abundant of the large Cretaceous fauna, Triceratops plucked low growth with its beak-tipped jaws. Triceratops teeth were arranged in groups called batteries, of 36 to 40 tooth columns, in each side of each jaw with 3 to 5 stacked teeth per column, depending on the individual’s size. This produces a range of 432 to 800 teeth, of which only a fraction were in use at any given time (due to tooth replacement). The great size and quantity of teeth suggests that they ate large volumes of fibrous plants. These were possibly palms, cycads, and ferns. (Wikipedia).

Triceratops was designated as the state fossil of South Dakota in 1988.

Because of its age and sedimentary composition, the Hell Creek Formation has become one of the most paleontological studied areas in the world. 158 genera of animals and 64 genera of plants are known from the formation and new discoveries are made frequently. In addition to Tyrannosaurs, Ceratopsids, and hadrosaurs, the formation has yielded remains of amphibians, reptiles, including lizards, snakes and turtles, fish and sharks, avian and non-avian dinosaurs, and mammals. The Hell Creek Formation gives the most complete understanding of the environment just before the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction.
FOR SALE
$4,295
DETAILS
SPECIES
Triceratops horridus
LOCATION
Bowman, North Dakota
FORMATION
Hell Creek Formation
SIZE
21.4" Long, 13.7" tall on stand
CATEGORY
SUB CATEGORY
ITEM
#131346
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